Preferred Walk On Status

  1. #1

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    Preferred Walk On Status

    I have heard this term thrown around for a while now and I'd like to get some hard definition of what this actually means. In particular, I'd like to know what services an athlete has access to under this status. Obviously, there is no guarantee a scholarship will ever be offered, and playing football means you are giving up a lot of other things. Among them, the opportunity to work to pay for your own education.

    For example, does this mean the same thing to all institutions? Does an athlete have the same access to training and tutoring services that scholarship athletes have? What are the hidden costs of PWO status?

    Appreciate any input. Thanks.
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    Quote Originally Posted by jolmstead View Post
    I have heard this term thrown around for a while now and I'd like to get some hard definition of what this actually means. In particular, I'd like to know what services an athlete has access to under this status. Obviously, there is no guarantee a scholarship will ever be offered, and playing football means you are giving up a lot of other things. Among them, the opportunity to work to pay for your own education.

    For example, does this mean the same thing to all institutions? Does an athlete have the same access to training and tutoring services that scholarship athletes have? What are the hidden costs of PWO status?

    Appreciate any input. Thanks.
    Basically this means you are treated the same, given the same access as scholarship athletes, and guaranteed a spot on the team. They've been recruited and the school feels like they could possibly contribute. Kids given this status tend to be missing something, like ideal size, speed, etc. Or maybe the kid has played against questionable competition throughout high school. Or maybe there are too many players already on scholly at their position. Kickers, punters, long snappers also usually get this status too, right out of high school. Most of the time if they come in and perform well they will eventually get a scholly. Obviously, PWO's will be responsible for paying their own tuition and room/board.

    True walk ons haven't been recruited or the staff feels like there is little chance chance for them to play, and have no guarantees of making the team.

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    I agree with rjs 4470. In many cases it's that the school doesn't have a scholarship available this year but would like that player to be part of the team. In most cases, it's a good investment for the school. No $ invested and if their hunch is right they can put the player on scholly once one becomes available.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rjs4470 View Post
    Basically this means you are treated the same, given the same access as scholarship athletes, and guaranteed a spot on the team. They've been recruited and the school feels like they could possibly contribute. Kids given this status tend to be missing something, like ideal size, speed, etc. Or maybe the kid has played against questionable competition throughout high school. Or maybe there are too many players already on scholly at their position. Kickers, punters, long snappers also usually get this status too, right out of high school. Most of the time if they come in and perform well they will eventually get a scholly. Obviously, PWO's will be responsible for paying their own tuition and room/board.

    True walk ons haven't been recruited or the staff feels like there is little chance chance for them to play, and have no guarantees of making the team.
    This is pretty spot on. I was a preferred walk-on at the beginning of my college career. I was recruited but the school was short on scholarships. I did everything the rest of the team did but I was responsible for the cost of tuition/housing my freshman year. I liked the school and the situation so I decided to go that route instead of other options I had at the time. It all worked out for me in the end, I received a scholarship after my freshman year.

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    Seems a bit risky if you are a from a family who may struggle to pay for the cost of a year of college and you might have other options.

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    Quote Originally Posted by spindoc View Post
    Seems a bit risky if you are a from a family who may struggle to pay for the cost of a year of college and you might have other options.
    I get the feeling that accepting a PWO is more of an emotional decision whereas I would be treating this as a business decision.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NKY Bandit View Post
    No $ invested and if their hunch is right they can put the player on scholly once one becomes available.
    I know this information would be hard to find, but I'm curious as to what percentage of kids who go as a preferred walk-on end up with a scholarship?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jumpman4004 View Post
    This is pretty spot on. I was a preferred walk-on at the beginning of my college career. I was recruited but the school was short on scholarships. I did everything the rest of the team did but I was responsible for the cost of tuition/housing my freshman year. I liked the school and the situation so I decided to go that route instead of other options I had at the time. It all worked out for me in the end, I received a scholarship after my freshman year.
    Sounds very similar to how it was explained to us.

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