What are Your Plans on August 21, 2017 (Total Solar Eclipse Day) ???

Page 3 of Anyone planning on attending a "watch party" or maybe traveling to an area that will be in the band of totality? This will be a pretty specia... 62 comments | 2149 Views | Go to page 1 →

  1. #31
    bugatti's Avatar
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    I know they are preparing for a boatload of people coming to Western Kentucky, particularly Hopkinsville, for the solar eclipse. I am interested, but not interested enough to go out of my way to view it.
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  2. #32
    True blue (and gold)'s Avatar
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    I've been looking forward to this for years. The closer it gets, the more excited I am!

  3. #33
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    I plan to get up and go to work.

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wireman View Post
    I plan to get up and go to work.
    Yep, work eclipses celestial events every time. *sigh*

  5. #35
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    I’m excited about this – I just learned about it the last month or so lol. I’ve heard the science teachers at my kid’s school are already planning a school wide viewing.

  6. #36
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    My daughter and I were just discussing this...depending on weather I could see us getting up and heading west that morning.

  7. #37
    True blue (and gold)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jumper_Dad View Post
    My daughter and I were just discussing this...depending on weather I could see us getting up and heading west that morning.
    Maybe we can plan to run into each other!

  8. #38

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    TV or maybe internet

  9. #39
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    I think Mrs Prof and I will travel to western Kentucky for the viewing. Talked to her about it last night and she said it sounded fine to her.

    Heck, I was out with a small telescope in the early morning hours on a remote hilltop near my home in order to get a good view when Halley's Comet made it's last appearance in 1986. I'm darn sure not going to miss this event.

    I've never been west of Bowling Green in Kentucky so this trip is also a good opportunity to see the opposite side of the state from where I live.

  10. #40
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    I would like to see this but will be at work.

  11. #41
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    http://www.cincinnati.com/story/ente...ati/412356001/

    For two minutes on Aug. 21, day will be night.

    But to see this astronomical event, it's all about the right time, right place – and right weather.

    We can predict a couple of these factors now, about two months before what's being dubbed the "Eclipse Across America."

    The time? That's 10:19 a.m. if you're on Oregon coast. Or 2:41 p.m. on the South Carolina shore.

    In other words, the exact timing depends on the place. And the only place to see the full eclipse – meaning when the moon completely blocks the sun – is on the path of totality.

    That's a 70-mile swath across the United States, moving west to east, passing through 14 states.

    Only about 12 million Americans live within the path, but some 200 million live within a day's drive. More than 2.1 million of those are Greater Cincinnatians.

    If you stay in Cincinnati, you can still see the greatest show not on Earth. In fact, everyone in North America will see at least a partial eclipse. It's the first time in 99 years that has been true.

    But if you're willing to go out of town to see something out of this world, you'll have plenty of company. Scientists, eclipse chasers and the curious have been planning for this for years, so hotels might be hard to come by.

    If you're still thinking about where to go, here are some towns along the path of totality that you can drive to in about five hours or less that day. (Remember, other people will have the same idea, so add traffic delays to the estimated travel times below.)

    Keep in mind none of these places will offer good eclipse viewing without that third factor – the weather. Though not even meteorologists can predict that this far in advance, scientists can look at the potential for cloudiness based on historical averages. (Hint: It's more likely to be cloudy where the humidity is high.) That's reflected below in the viewability percentage: The higher the percentage, the better chance of clear skies, at least historically speaking.

    Hopkinsville, Kentucky

    Why? Very close to the "point of greatest eclipse" in the small nearby town of Cerulean – the phenomenon's global center point – Hopkinsville is pulling out all the stops for the occasion. An Eclipse Con and a festival are among the events listed on the town's website – eclilpseville.com.

    Drive time from Cincinnati: 4 hours, 4 minutes

    Estimated start time of total eclipse: 2: 24 p.m. EST

    Duration of total eclipse: 2 minutes 40.1 seconds

    Viewability percentage: 52 (closest data available is from Fort Campbell)

    Bowling Green, Kentucky

    Why? This is about the shortest drive you can make from Cincinnati to see the total eclipse. The city's minor league baseball team, the Hot Rods, is hosting a "Ballpark Blackout," with free eclipse glasses for the first 2,000 fans at the day game.

    Drive time from Cincinnati: 3 hours, 23 minutes

    Estimated time of eclipse: 2:27 p.m. EST

    Duration of total eclipse: 1 minute 1.7 seconds

    Viewability percentage: 71

    Carbondale, Illinois

    Why? Based on historical data, this city has the best chance of low clouds within a five-hour drive. Even NASA TV will be going there to broadcast live.

    Drive time from Cincinnati: 5 hours,1 minute

    Estimated start time of total eclipse: 2:20 p.m. EST

    Duration of total eclipse: 2 minutes 31.2 seconds

    Viewability percentage: 80

    Giant City State Park, near Makanda, Illinois

    Why? This is the point of greatest duration, meaning the total eclipse will last the longest (though, admittedly, it's only 0.1-second longer than down the road in Hopkinsville). This park is also part of Shawnee National Forest, so light pollution will be minimal. Plus, you could take a hike and see some rock formations during the rest of the day.

    Drive time from Cincinnati: 5 hours, 11 minutes

    Estimated start time of total eclipse: 2:20 p.m. EST

    Duration of total eclipse: 2 minutes 40.2 seconds

    Viewability percentage: We don't have this data available. But the park is just south of Carbondale, the closest place with the best viewability percentage, at 80.

    Nashville, Tennessee

    Why? Nashville is the largest metropolitan area along the path of totality, so if you do want to look for a hotel room, you might have the best luck here. (A quick search on June 21 yielded a long list of available rooms, though some had hefty price tags.)

    Drive time from Cincinnati: 4 hours, 9 minutes

    Estimated time of eclipse: 2:27 EST

    Duration of total eclipse: 1 minute 53.4 seconds

    Viewability percentage: 44

    Want more?

    You can also sit in the comfort of your home and watch the event online at nasa.gov/eclipselive. For safety tips and other suggestion, visit eclipse2017.nasa.gov/.

  12. #42
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    Hope you guys planning on coming to this end of the state have your rooms. Saw where the Super 8 in Metropolis, IL has their last rooms at $700.... To put into perspective the quality of this place,the next week they're about $50...

  13. #43

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    While this does fascinate me, I don't see myself making the drive south. The eclipse as viewed in NKY will still block out well over 90% of the sun.

  14. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by sportsfan41 View Post
    While this does fascinate me, I don't see myself making the drive south. The eclipse as viewed in NKY will still block out well over 90% of the sun.
    People that have seen total eclipses will tell you have there is an extraordinary difference between even 99% covered and totality.

  15. #45

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    At 2:40pm, I'll be snoozing...ah, the night shift life!

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