Today is 9/11

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  1. #16
    B-Ball-fan's Avatar
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    News video from 2007 discussing the Flight 93 Memorial with Tom Burnett Sr. (father of crash victim Tom Burnett Jr.) pleading to scrap the flawed design.

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  2. #17
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    Every year on this day, I watch documentaries and get really mad...then cry...then mad. I never want to forget the feelings that 9/11 makes me have.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wireman View Post
    Every year on this day, I watch documentaries and get really mad...then cry...then mad. I never want to forget the feelings that 9/11 makes me have.
    Just watched "102 Minutes That Changed America" on the History Channel. It's so easy to get those same feelings again watching a program like that.

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by nkypete View Post
    Just watched "102 Minutes That Changed America" on the History Channel. It's so easy to get those same feelings again watching a program like that.
    That's the one to watch. Every year, you should watch that one. Also, "9/11" about the firefighters is very powerful.

  5. #20
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    It feels strange having it fall on a Tuesday once again. Happened in 2007 and 2012 as well.

    I'll be thinking about it throughout the day, and remembering everything about the entire day 17 years ago, no doubt.

    The Covington Catholic community also shares a special remembrance of CCH grad Brian Williams, who was a bond trader for Cantor Fitzgerald and died in the collapse of the North Tower at the World Trade Center. Brian was a 1990 graduate of Cov Cath, and played on the 1987 and 1988 state championship football teams. He was one of the early winners of the Northern Kentucky Coaches Association's "That's My Boy" award, which has since been renamed to bear his name. Brian went on to play college football at Columbia University in New York before moving on to his professional career, and was often dubbed by acquaintances as New York City's unofficial tourist bureau for visiting Kentuckians.

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  6. #21
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    I was having a discussion with my wife this morning. She is a substitute teacher in the Kenton County school system for grades kindergarten through 5. How do you teach children that age about 9/11?

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by nkypete View Post
    I was having a discussion with my wife this morning. She is a substitute teacher in the Kenton County school system for grades kindergarten through 5. How do you teach children that age about 9/11?
    At some point it just becomes historical fact. I'm sure my grandparents still see something like Pearl Harbor in a way I don't and would never be able to. The relative recency of 9/11 means it impacts the world we live in now more than something like Pearl Harbor though.

    Heck, my brother is 7 years younger than me and I'm supremely confident he has a VERY different memory of all it at age 10 than I do from age 17.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Getslow View Post
    At some point it just becomes historical fact. I'm sure my grandparents still see something like Pearl Harbor in a way I don't and would never be able to. The relative recency of 9/11 means it impacts the world we live in now more than something like Pearl Harbor though.

    Heck, my brother is 7 years younger than me and I'm supremely confident he has a VERY different memory of all it at age 10 than I do from age 17.
    My daughter is 22. She really doesn't remember much of anything about that day.

    It's kind of like Kennedy's Assassination. I was an infant. It is relegated to B&W photos and the Zapruder film. It's devastating to learn about but it's not the same as for those who remember it and who considered the world changed by that day.

    Same for those of us who were adults and adults with children on 9/11. The only other day that came close to it was the Virginia Tech Massacre because of our proximity, the kids we knew at the school and the grads who are our friends. Also, the couple of officers I know who worked the event and the stories they told.

    There is history, and then there is "world changed for me" history.

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hatz View Post
    My daughter is 22. She really doesn't remember much of anything about that day.

    It's kind of like Kennedy's Assassination. I was an infant. It is relegated to B&W photos and the Zapruder film. It's devastating to learn about but it's not the same as for those who remember it and who considered the world changed by that day.

    Same for those of us who were adults and adults with children on 9/11. The only other day that came close to it was the Virginia Tech Massacre because of our proximity, the kids we knew at the school and the grads who are our friends. Also, the couple of officers I know who worked the event and the stories they told.

    There is history, and then there is "world changed for me" history.
    I was talking about it with my girlfriend last night. I'm 34 years old. Sept. 11 is essentially the middle point of my life now. And I've lived my entire adult life in its shadow.

    By the time I graduated in high school in May of 2002, we had been in Afghanistan for 7 or 8 months. Anyone I knew that enlisted or joined ROTC, or went to one of the service academies knew with almost 100% certainty that they were signing up to get shipped off to war. I had that choice. I declined. I know any number of guys who ran headlong into a war I wanted NOTHING to do with. I think about that a lot.

    Maybe the fact that I became an adult at that same time affects the way I see it, but the world seemed to get a whole lot more serious and not insignificantly more frightening after that day. Maybe with time we'll be able to look at its circumstances, causes, and consequences with some objectivity and the rationality that the distance of time affords historians. We're not there yet. I'm certainly not.

  10. #25
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    I had a fear that day that I had never had before and haven't had since.

  11. #26
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    My wife called me at work and told me about it. I was stunned as I told others that they just didn't seem to grasp what was going on. I walked around in a daze wondering what was going on, until Walmart Home Office made the decision to pipe cable news to all of the TV's in Electronics.

    I remember looking up at the clear blue sky late that afternoon and telling my son we'd never see a sky without jets again. It was strange not seeing one plane or contrail in the sky.

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Getslow View Post
    At some point it just becomes historical fact. I'm sure my grandparents still see something like Pearl Harbor in a way I don't and would never be able to. The relative recency of 9/11 means it impacts the world we live in now more than something like Pearl Harbor though.

    Heck, my brother is 7 years younger than me and I'm supremely confident he has a VERY different memory of all it at age 10 than I do from age 17.
    I know what you mean. I was 20 when it happened, and my wife's brother was only 8. I remember several years back, I was over at my in-laws on September 11th and was shooting basketball with him on the patio before dinner. Out of nowhere he asked, "What was September 11th like?"

    It really took me aback for a moment, because it was so distinct a memory for me. I actually met with a Navy recruiter in the week following the attacks (my older brother, an Army veteran, talked me out of enlistment). But anyway, as I was talking to my brother-in-law, he said, basically, that the school did what it could to shelter the students from a good bit of the reality of what was happening. I believe his words were something like, "I mean, I knew something bad had happened and that people had died, but that was about all I knew."

    This far removed from September 11, 2001 (and it still is weird for me to think of it in terms of "far removed"), I think when you go about teaching it to younger students, the best approach should be to look at it in the most basic terms as possible. Wrong versus right, or good versus evil maybe. As kids we learned about things like the American Revolution, the US Civil War, World War I, and World War II. When we were young we learned those things in broad brush strokes. American Colonials wanted fight off imperialist Great Britain. The Union fought to end slavery in the south. WWI was fought over imperialism and nationalist struggle against foreign rule. WWII was fought to stop the Holocaust and fight against the Axis Powers' onslaught against the rest of the world. I would explain 9/11 as something along the line of Middle Eastern extremists fighting making a bold attack on one of the powers in the western world in effort to help prevent the perceived thread of western culture invading their ways of life.

  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jumper_Dad View Post
    My wife called me at work and told me about it. I was stunned as I told others that they just didn't seem to grasp what was going on. I walked around in a daze wondering what was going on, until Walmart Home Office made the decision to pipe cable news to all of the TV's in Electronics.

    I remember looking up at the clear blue sky late that afternoon and telling my son we'd never see a sky without jets again. It was strange not seeing one plane or contrail in the sky.
    The daze I had that day is something I don't think I'll ever forget, and certainly hope to never experience again. So many things were SO surreal to me that day.

    The looks on my parents' faces as I woke up and saw them looking at the morning news coverage on the television. Neither of them even turned to acknowledge me standing there...and then the second plane came in a struck the south tower.

    The way the parking lots were nearly empty at campus at NKU because so many students spontaneously decided against going to school. Watching live news coverage on the TV my building structures professor had wheeled into the classroom, and seeing people diving out of windows 100 floors up. Then watching the first tower collapse, and the professor telling us all to just go home. "Don't worry about your other classes. Just go home."

    Listening to the live coverage on the Howard Stern show coming from his Manhattan radio studio as I drove from campus to the law firm where I was working at the time. And the way I constantly watched the skies where I'd seen airplanes lining up for landings at CVG and continued to see nothing. Seeing the police cars lined up all the way around the federal courthouses in Covington and Cincinnati.

    I remember driving around for 2 or 3 hours that night, switching back and forth between radio news coverage and silence with my thoughts.

    I remember the poignant openings from the first episodes of SNL, Conan O'Brien and Letterman following the attacks.

    Those are all of the things that stick with me the most.

  14. #29
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    I’ll never forget waking up on 9/12 and remembering how Patriotic our country was on that day.

    I wasn’t around for Pearl Harbor, but the feeling must have been eerily similar.

    Thanks to all the men and women who sacrificed that day, R.I.P. the victims of the attack.

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    I remember filling the car up with gas the on the way home from work, not knowing if the gas supply would be interrupted.

    Here's a question : Without looking it up how long after 9-11 did it take the U.S. to terminate Osama Bin Laden with extreme prejudice?

    This was one of those days that you always remember were you were when you heard about it........like the Kennedy assassination, man on the moon, etc.

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