Dry counties in Kentucky

  1. #1
    _Scarface_'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 07
    Location
    UNC 86 UK 77...Can you say 4 victories in a row for the Heels vs UK?...Gardner Webb?...WOW!
    Posts
    4,388

    Dry counties in Kentucky

    Just some info...

    Of the 120 counties of Kentucky, 54 are completely dry and 30 are wet. The remaining 36 counties fall somewhere in between.

    * Under Kentucky Revised Statutes (KRS) 242.123, an individual precinct within a dry county that contains a USGA-regulation golf course may vote to allow the sale of alcoholic beverages by the drink on that specific course. As of the last officially published update on Kentucky wet and dry counties by the Kentucky Office of Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC) in August 2005, 13 courses in 10 different counties were approved for such sales.

    * KRS 243.155 allows individual precincts within dry counties to vote to allow a "small farm winery" to operate within the precinct. Once approved, a winery not only can produce and sell wine on its premises, but can also apply for a license to sell wine and beer by the drink in a restaurant located on its premises. As of August 2005, 11 wineries were operating in 9 dry counties under this statute; two other wineries, both in the same county, were similarly approved but have since closed. KRS 243.154 allows a wholesale distributor of wine produced in small farm wineries to operate in dry territory.

    * In addition to Shelbyville and Ashland, 14 other cities are wet cities located in dry counties. An otherwise dry county for general retail sales that contains a wet city is also known as a moist county.

    * A study of about 39,000 alcohol-related traffic accidents in Kentucky found that residents of dry counties are more likely to be involved in such crashes, possibly because they have to drive farther from their homes to consume alcohol, thus increasing impaired driving exposure. The study concludes that county-level prohibition is not necessarily effective in improving highway safety.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dry_cou...es_in_Kentucky
    Advertisement

  2. #2
    Ms Liberty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 06
    Location
    Go Reds!!!
    Posts
    3,903

    Pike co is dry , but the city of Pikeville is wet.

  3. #3
    fp30's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 06
    Location
    in the county dreaming of going back to the fort
    Posts
    304

    Same thing here in Pendleton Co., county dry, city of Falmouth wet...

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Nov 05
    Posts
    1,271

    I would be curious to read more about the study.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Dec 06
    Location
    At the Card Table
    Posts
    16,918

    I believe Rowan County is dry and Morehead is wet, as well as Lewis Co. is dry and Vanceburg is wet.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Dec 05
    Posts
    2,320

    Quote Originally Posted by _Scarface_
    * In addition to Shelbyville and Ashland, 14 other cities are wet cities located in dry counties. An otherwise dry county for general retail sales that contains a wet city is also known as a moist county.
    I thought "moist" referred to counties where bars could serve beer and wine but not liquor (like Eminence, KY, I believe)?

  7. #7
    Wireman's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 05
    Location
    8507 Queens Boulevard
    Posts
    46,076

    Dry Counties = Lots of Extra Mileage on my car

  8. #8
    TaterSalad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 04
    Location
    At the bar
    Posts
    1,201

    On average wet counties have lower un-employment rates also.

    Most large companies prefer not to build in dry counties.

  9. #9
    jahearme's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 04
    Location
    On the 18th, putting for birdie
    Posts
    7,013

    Quote Originally Posted by TaterSalad
    On average wet counties have lower un-employment rates also.

    Most large companies prefer not to build in dry counties.
    Just ask Hardin Co....

  10. #10
    spe690's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 06
    Location
    Prestonsburg
    Posts
    1,867

    A county being dry causes larger chain restaurants (Applebees, Fridays, Outback, Etc.) to not come into an area. Thats why, if you lived in Paintsville and wanted to have a nice meal, you would have to go to Bob Evans or Ponderosa unless you want to drive to Prestonsburg or Pikeville.

  11. #11
    fanofkyfootball's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 03
    Location
    " Come on, hit me!! " - The Joker
    Posts
    4,770

    Lawrence County = Dry County

    Fort Gay, WV = Home to the biggest distributor store in the entire state of WV.
    Distance between Fort Gay and Louisa = 1/4 mile ( NO COINCIDENCE )

  12. #12
    TonyDanza's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 04
    Location
    Louisville
    Posts
    19,003

    Quote Originally Posted by Wireman
    Dry Counties = Lots of Extra Mileage on my car

  13. #13
    Habib's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 06
    Location
    Buy the ticket, take the ride
    Posts
    11,459

    Forget dry counties, everyone knows they are worthless, what about blue laws?

  14. #14
    NEERFAN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 01
    Location
    Contest Stalwart per mcpapa
    Posts
    32,959

    Quote Originally Posted by sports fan
    I thought "moist" referred to counties where bars could serve beer and wine but not liquor (like Eminence, KY, I believe)?
    I think it's rediculous to serve beer/wine but not liquor, makes no sense to me. I believe moist means restaraunts can serve alcohol as long as 70 something percent of their sales are food related.

  15. #15
    _Scarface_'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 07
    Location
    UNC 86 UK 77...Can you say 4 victories in a row for the Heels vs UK?...Gardner Webb?...WOW!
    Posts
    4,388

    A moist county is on "middle ground" between a dry county (where the sale of alcohol is illegal) and a wet county (one where alcohol is sold). The term is typically used as a generalization for a county that allows alcohol to be sold in certain situations, but has limitations on alcohol sales that a normal wet county wouldn't have. Some historically dry counties are switching to this system to avoid losing money to businesses in other counties, but do not wish to become completely "wet." The term in itself doesn't have any specific meaning, just that the county isn't completely wet but isn't dry. Each county makes up its own rules on alcohol sales.

    A dry county that contains one or more wet cities is typically called moist.

    [edit] Examples

    In Kentucky, the term can be used in two different senses:

    * Dry counties, as well as cities located in dry counties, can vote to authorize limited sales of alcoholic beverages by the drink in restaurants that make at least 70% of their money from food (rather than alcohol) sales and seat at least 100 patrons. Once a jurisdiction votes for such sales, qualifying restaurants can apply for a permit, which are distributed on a somewhat limited basis. For example, the Louisville suburban jurisdiction of Oldham County has recently voted to allow such sales. Note, however, that Kentucky's Office of Alcoholic Beverage Control does not use the term "moist county" to describe a county in which such sales are allowed, calling it instead a "limited" county.[1]

    * Officially, a "moist county" is an otherwise dry county in which a city has voted to allow full retail sales of alcoholic beverages. The following Kentucky counties[1] fall in this category:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moist_county

    It's funny that all the info wikipedia has on this subject is about Ky.

Top