Any Photogs Here?

  1. #1
    TheDeuce's Avatar
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    Any Photogs Here?

    I bought a new camera last week, Canon Rebel EOS T6. I've always been interested in photography, so I'm looking forward to learning this camera and shooting some cool stuff. Anybody else have photography as a hobby. Any tips or advice?
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheDeuce View Post
    I bought a new camera last week, Canon Rebel EOS T6. I've always been interested in photography, so I'm looking forward to learning this camera and shooting some cool stuff. Anybody else have photography as a hobby. Any tips or advice?
    I used to have a photography business on the side...used to do mostly sports stuff, and occasional portrait sessions. Used to shoot Nikon, but now have all Canon gear. Quite honestly, I really haven’t done much at all over the last 4 or 5years.

  3. #3
    theguru's Avatar
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    Practice.

    Learn how to use the camera then stick your face in it and practice practice practice.

    One pro tip, you know football, trust your judgement on what is coming and you will find yourself in the right place at the right time for some great action shots.

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    Jim Schue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by theguru View Post
    Practice.

    Learn how to use the camera then stick your face in it and practice practice practice.

    One pro tip, you know football, trust your judgement on what is coming and you will find yourself in the right place at the right time for some great action shots.
    All of this. Donít be afraid to try different things and fail. Itís how you learn, and itís definitely not cost-prohibitive like film where you hope you get 1 or 2 good shots in a roll of 12.

    Donít let the camera tell you what to do. Donít ever use program mode or any of the other special mode settings. Manual is always best so you can control your shutter speed and aperture.

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    theguru's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Schue View Post
    All of this. Don’t be afraid to try different things and fail. It’s how you learn, and it’s definitely not cost-prohibitive like film where you hope you get 1 or 2 good shots in a roll of 12.

    Don’t let the camera tell you what to do. Don’t ever use program mode or any of the other special mode settings. Manual is always best so you can control your shutter speed and aperture.
    I took some shortcuts @Jim Schue

    I think anyone new to photography should experiment with the "auto modes" because I believe it can teach you a lot about what you are doing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Schue View Post
    All of this. Don’t be afraid to try different things and fail. It’s how you learn, and it’s definitely not cost-prohibitive like film where you hope you get 1 or 2 good shots in a roll of 12.

    Don’t let the camera tell you what to do. Don’t ever use program mode or any of the other special mode settings. Manual is always best so you can control your shutter speed and aperture.
    I never shot anything in full manual. I almost always shoot in Aperture priority. Shooting anything that isn’t static, and in changing light conditions, I don’t want to be messing around changing settings. I choose DOF (by picking my own aperture) set ISO to auto (with an upper limit) and let the camera choose the correct shutter speed for exposure. If the shutter speed ends up too slow, I can make adjustments to apeture. You don’t want to miss shots playing with settings as conditions change. I don’t know any pros who shoot sports, weddings, etc who shoot in full manual. If you’re in a studio with complete control over lighting, or shooting static subjects in bright steady light, full manual can make sense. Even then, with modern cameras, I’m completely willing to manually choose aperture, and let the camera do the rest.

    I rarely use any of the preset modes, but even they can make sense, especially if you are in difficult, changing conditions. The programming on modern cameras is nothing short of amazing, and they will all do a good job in the preset modes.

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    TheDeuce's Avatar
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    You guys are speaking a foreign language.

    I may break out the camera later and check out all the settings. I really need to get out and shoot some.

  8. #8
    Jim Schue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rjs4470 View Post
    I never shot anything in full manual. I almost always shoot in Aperture priority. Shooting anything that isn’t static, and in changing light conditions, I don’t want to be messing around changing settings. I choose DOF (by picking my own aperture) set ISO to auto (with an upper limit) and let the camera choose the correct shutter speed for exposure. If the shutter speed ends up too slow, I can make adjustments to apeture. You don’t want to miss shots playing with settings as conditions change. I don’t know any pros who shoot sports, weddings, etc who shoot in full manual. If you’re in a studio with complete control over lighting, or shooting static subjects in bright steady light, full manual can make sense. Even then, with modern cameras, I’m completely willing to manually choose aperture, and let the camera do the rest.

    I rarely use any of the preset modes, but even they can make sense, especially if you are in difficult, changing conditions. The programming on modern cameras is nothing short of amazing, and they will all do a good job in the preset modes.
    I see what you mean, to a degree. More often than not I shoot in aperture mode, but that’s in daylight, and that can still play havoc with the readings. Think dark jersey v. white jersey in the same shot. Tends to confuse the heck out of the light metering and I still end up having to do a lot of adjusting in Photoshop to correct.

    When it’s dark (football games, or inside gyms), it’s always full manual.

    I learned how to shoot on film, in full manual, so I learned how to quickly adjust my stuff on the fly.

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    gold sunrise's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheDeuce View Post
    You guys are speaking a foreign language.
    I will just stick with my phone camera...

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    Quote Originally Posted by gold sunrise View Post
    I will just stick with my phone camera...
    They are scary good these days for simple portrait shots and such, but the lack of control over the settings makes this OCD type (with a healthy dose of control freak mixed in) very skittish. Can't trust 'em.

    And, of course, they are useless for stopping the motion in sports.

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    I taught myself to shoot manual and I use it all the time. Best advice I got from Guru was try and get the eyes on actions shot coming at me. The Canon photography forum has lots of good stuff on it. Shoot, shoot and shoot some more.

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    Not only shoot, shoot, shoot but pay attention to your settings. When you go back and review your pictures, it will tell you what your f-stop and shutter were as well as ISO. This helps you learn the best settings for the situation you are shooting

    I have started using Shutter Priority when taking outside pics and like what I see.

    And if all else fails, you can always watch YouTube tutorials that will answer questions such as shutter speed, aperture, ISO, and White Balance.

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    I do the side-stuff and started with a Rebel and will offer some basic advice for new D-SLR user here.

    1. Now that you are in the SLR world realize that you have the one of the cheapest components now - the camera body. You should have a basic zoom lens - 70 - 300. The one that is around $100 or so at Best Buy. But the next step is a $1,200+ 70-200 2.8 L-series. Buy it new. Not used off e-bay.

    2. Until you make that jump, and even after you do, you will have get used to the settings - aperture, shutter-speed, ISO to get good or even decent shots under most high school lights or inside most high school gyms. Night and low light is where you get the use of a D-SLR and expensive lens.

    3. In bright day-light for sports - Canon sports setting is just fine. No need to go manual in those conditions.

    4. If you have a good point-and-shoot like a Canon Powershot - do not toss it. It still comes in handy when you have the zoom lens but want close-ups field side. I also rarely take the SLR on vacation. I see guys with the their SLRs on the first day of a cruise walking around. Don't usually see them again carry that big camera around when a point-and-shoot will fit it your pocket.


    5. Software. Adobe Elements and if you want to spend the money Adobe Photoshop are good to have. You can use the software from Canon but it always seems clunky and less easy to use the the two above. Also there is a good freeware product called IRFANView that can do a lot of basic editing if you are on PC (vs. Mac). Also, exif editors and bulk fire rename utilities that can read the exif data are useful if you want to use the date and time to catalog pictures by their date/time taken.

    6. Lenses are manufacturer specific. Tamron makes lenses for both Nike and Canon. So be careful if buying that brand. I have bought one used lens off of ebay. It was defective and the seller would not cooperate. Only time I had to use the e-bay protection. So I buy only new, warrentied lenses now.

    Remember that the real power of the SLR is the lenses. If you stick with SLR you will need to invest in lenses. And they are not cheap.

  14. #14
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    My wife is a camera bug and just switched from Canon to Nikon. She splurged for the brand new Nikon D850 and a new Nikon 70-200mm f/2.8 lens. What does this mean to me? Nothing because I don't know squat about cameras but I definitely know that both of them cost me $6,200!

    On the bright side, she absolutely loves this camera/lens and is in photographer heaven and I'm a hero. It's a good thing she's cute because she sure as heck isn't cheap.

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    The one piece of advice I can give is not to use the term "photog".

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