Any DIY Woodworkers out there in BGP land?

Page 6 of I've been trying to stay off the couch and keep myself busy. Recently the wife asked if I had any room in my closet for some of her stuff. (REALLY Lady... 95 comments | 3318 Views | Go to page 1 →

  1. #76
    CincySportsFan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HammerTime View Post
    I'm going to get a router for my birthday, any suggestions? My first order of business will be using it on cutting boards.
    Like @nees1212 I have a seperate plunge router and fixed base one. (Originally had plans to make a router table with the fixed base one...but just hasn't happened yet.)

    However, since I was wanting my son to help as much as possible with his mom's cutting board, I went out and bought a $30 ($24 after coupon) trim router at Harbor Freight. Normally I'm not a big fan of their electronic tools, but thought it might be worth the risk. Now, after using it...I wish I would've bought it sooner. It's lightweight, so you can operate it with one hand, so I could use the other to hold the board (no clamps!). Pretty cool little router for the money. Would I use it to make raised panels for cabinetry? Heck no. But for a round over bit? Worked just fine.

    I guess it's all what you plan on using it for down the line.
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  2. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by CincySportsFan View Post
    Like @nees1212 I have a seperate plunge router and fixed base one. (Originally had plans to make a router table with the fixed base one...but just hasn't happened yet.)

    However, since I was wanting my son to help as much as possible with his mom's cutting board, I went out and bought a $30 ($24 after coupon) trim router at Harbor Freight. Normally I'm not a big fan of their electronic tools, but thought it might be worth the risk. Now, after using it...I wish I would've bought it sooner. It's lightweight, so you can operate it with one hand, so I could use the other to hold the board (no clamps!). Pretty cool little router for the money. Would I use it to make raised panels for cabinetry? Heck no. But for a round over bit? Worked just fine.

    I guess it's all what you plan on using it for down the line.
    I was looking at a Roybi trim router that's a decent price and great reviews. I already have a few roybi batteries. I'd like to think I would end up using it a ton, but honestly that's probably all I will be using it on for now. I just don't have to time to do the things I want to do.

    Ryobi ONE+ Trim Router (Bare-Tool)-P61 - The Home Depot

  3. #78
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    I'd encourage you to go to the store and see if they've got a display model out of the box. Make sure it feels comfortable in your hand, and doesn't feel top heavy. That'd be the first thing I'd be concerned with by having a battery on top. Seems like some of the reviews say they nailed it, but everybody has a different opinion on what feels good and what doesn't. Make sure it feels good to you.

    Other than that, it looks like a good little router. The only thing to keep in mind (and I'll have to do this with my trim router) is that it's a fixed rpm, so the 29,000 may be considered too high for some bits. But, when I looked at the profiles that I've either already used or the ones that I've thought about getting, most of them were in acceptable range. The other ones I'll just have to use on my bigger, variable-speed router.

  4. #79
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    Almost done with my building. Still have some trim left to put on and then paint. Probably 98% complete at this point.
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  5. #80
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    I bought a cedar porch swing several years ago from a guy who made it but left it pretty rough.

    At the time I foolishly put a coat of poly on it and hung it on the back porch. The poly turned color over time and the finish looked bad so I decided to redo it.

    So so this weekend I took it apart and removed the old finish. Some with sandpaper and some either the planer. I softened the edges where you come in contact with it on the router table. Than a finish sanding.

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    Now I want to put a finish on it, but no more poly. I've read a lot and am leaning towards boiled linseed oil, pure tung oil, or teak oil. I think I'm going to use teak oil but haven't decided yet.

    Anyone have experience with this on cedar?
    Last edited by Colonels_Wear_Blue; May 30, 17 at 02:37 PM. Reason: Added Photos

  6. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by CincySportsFan View Post
    I'd encourage you to go to the store and see if they've got a display model out of the box. Make sure it feels comfortable in your hand, and doesn't feel top heavy. That'd be the first thing I'd be concerned with by having a battery on top. Seems like some of the reviews say they nailed it, but everybody has a different opinion on what feels good and what doesn't. Make sure it feels good to you.

    Other than that, it looks like a good little router. The only thing to keep in mind (and I'll have to do this with my trim router) is that it's a fixed rpm, so the 29,000 may be considered too high for some bits. But, when I looked at the profiles that I've either already used or the ones that I've thought about getting, most of them were in acceptable range. The other ones I'll just have to use on my bigger, variable-speed router.
    I'm getting new golf clubs instead. This can wait.

  7. #82
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    nvm

  8. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by woodsrider View Post
    Almost done with my building. Still have some trim left to put on and then paint. Probably 98% complete at this point.
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    Looks good! Was that a kit, or did you lay that out yourself?

  9. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by Watusi View Post
    I bought a cedar porch swing several years ago from a guy who made it but left it pretty rough.

    At the time I foolishly put a coat of poly on it and hung it on the back porch. The poly turned color over time and the finish looked bad so I decided to redo it.

    So so this weekend I took it apart and removed the old finish. Some with sandpaper and some either the planer. I softened the edges where you come in contact with it on the router table. Than a finish sanding.

    Now I want to put a finish on it, but no more poly. I've read a lot and am leaning towards boiled linseed oil, pure tung oil, or teak oil. I think I'm going to use teak oil but haven't decided yet.

    Anyone have experience with this on cedar?
    The only thing I've ever put on cedar is deck sealant. I know they make sealants that are made specific for cedar (although normal Thompson's Water Seal will work as well). Have you looked into that at all? It would make for a cheaper option.

  10. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by CincySportsFan View Post
    Looks good! Was that a kit, or did you lay that out yourself?
    Did it myself. Went and looked at a few different ones to get ideas how i wanted to do it. Used a website to calculate the roof truss pieces and found a youtube video for ideas on the doors.

  11. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by Colonels_Wear_Blue View Post
    The only thing I've ever put on cedar is deck sealant. I know they make sealants that are made specific for cedar (although normal Thompson's Water Seal will work as well). Have you looked into that at all? It would make for a cheaper option.
    I thought about it but I really want to preserve the natural look of the wood. I've read that oil is the way to go for that.

    With a preservative like Thompson's is there a lot of color change?

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    Quote Originally Posted by CincySportsFan View Post
    Forgot to post pictures from last weekend. Got both cutting boards done. The cherry-dominant one was for my mom, while the walnut-dominant is what we made for my wife.

    Attachment 61962

    Attachment 61963

    Considering they were our first ones, I'm happy. Learned a few things that I'd do differently, if we did them over again.
    Besides Cherry and Walnut, what are the other woods that you used?

  13. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by woodsrider View Post
    Did it myself. Went and looked at a few different ones to get ideas how i wanted to do it. Used a website to calculate the roof truss pieces and found a youtube video for ideas on the doors.
    Very nice! Difficulty factor just went up a few notches .

  14. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by Watusi View Post
    I thought about it but I really want to preserve the natural look of the wood. I've read that oil is the way to go for that.

    With a preservative like Thompson's is there a lot of color change?
    I can't speak too much for Thompson's, specifically, but I know most major coatings manufacturers make exterior penetrating oils that are intended to stain decks and the like without changing color of the wood too much - it's largely been due to an increase in exotic wood species such as ipe for decks and other exposed exterior structures.

    Behr has a line of exterior grade penetrating oils that seem to sell pretty well. You could look into those.

  15. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by Watusi View Post
    I thought about it but I really want to preserve the natural look of the wood. I've read that oil is the way to go for that.

    With a preservative like Thompson's is there a lot of color change?
    Tried an oil only option (no sealer) on my mom's cedar garden furniture. Really brought out the rich tones. It accentuated natural color variations (heartwood/sapwood/knots). She didn't like the look, and the oil was a dirt, pollen, and mildew magnet. Raised the wood's soft grain. Took a long time to dry and cure too.

    Following year, she found a Defy Extreme water-based, semi-transparent deck sealant / stain in "grey" that mimics natural cedar weathering. Had to power wash the old finish and dirt off first. Pros: Evened out the color variations; easy to apply and clean up. Cons: A little pricey up front. Still looks good after three years.
    Last edited by Runcible Owl; May 30, 17 at 05:07 PM.

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